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Sliding Oblique Metatarsal Osteotomy Fixated With a K-Wire Without Cheilectomy for Hallux Rigidus

  • Kenichiro Nakajima
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Kenichiro Nakajima, MD, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yashio Central General Hospital, 845 Minamikawasaki, Yashio-shi, Saitama 340-0814 Japan.
    Affiliations
    Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yashio Central General Hospital, Saitama, Japan
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Published:August 05, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1053/j.jfas.2021.07.022

      Abstract

      The current study aimed to assess the outcomes of sliding oblique metatarsal osteotomy fixated with a K-wire without cheilectomy for hallux rigidus. Pre- and postoperative variables, including dorsiflexion angle, visual analog scale score, and Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot scale score, were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. In addition, the surgical effects among the four grades were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. In total, 43 patients, including 11, 11, 15, and 6 with grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 hallux rigidus, respectively, were enrolled in this analysis. The mean age of the participants was 56.2 years, and the mean follow-up period was 3.0 years. Mean pre- and postoperative dorsiflexion angles were as follows: overall, 53.0° to 66.5° (p < .001); grade 1, 66.8° to 79.1°; grade 2, 59.1° to 68.6°; grade 3, 43.3° to 61.0°; and grade 4, 40.8° to 53.3°. Mean pre- and postoperative visual analog scale scores were as follows: overall, 70.1 to 6.5 (p < .001); grade 1, 74.2 to 3.0; grade 2, 66.4 to 7.6; grade 3, 69.5 to 8.4; and grade 4, 71.2 to 6.0. Finally, mean pre- and postoperative Japanese Society for Surgery of the Foot scale scores were as follows: overall, 61.2 to 86.6 (p < .001); grade 1, 63.8 to 93.6; grade 2, 68.3 to 85.9; grade 3, 54.4 to 83.1; and grade 4, 60.5 to 83.5. There was no statistically significant difference in the surgical effects among the four grades. Decompressive metatarsal osteotomy without cheilectomy was found to be effective. Moreover, the procedure could be performed for all grades of hallux rigidus.

      Level of Clinical Evidence

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